Author: Charles

What’s behind Toronto’s apparent COVID-19 hot spot?

What’s behind Toronto’s apparent COVID-19 hot spot?

These maps show Toronto’s current COVID-19 hot spots are not where you think they are

The Canadian Observatory for Drug Use and Addictions, a former research centre that has grown from a small group of researchers to a major government-backed project, is now helping Ottawa respond to the coronavirus pandemic

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The Canadian Observatory for Drug Use and Addictions, a former research centre that has grown from a small group of researchers to a major government-backed project, is now helping Ottawa respond to the coronavirus pandemic

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What’s behind Toronto’s apparent COVID-19 hot spot this week is not the city’s most populous area.

And for the most part, when you factor in the entire city, it doesn’t appear a big city — even if, in a way, you could argue the big city is Toronto.

So, what’s behind Toronto’s apparent COVID-19 hot spot?

The answer comes from the Toronto Public Health (TPH) map on Wednesday. It shows the hot spots — the locations that have reported the most cases of the coronavirus — for Ontario on a map. That’s the blue-and-white pattern.

The pattern is not actually a hot spot, it’s that the blue and white pattern is a hot spot. The pattern is the pattern that’s in some places blue and white, in others it’s red and grey (and green and yellow).

TPH also has a map of COVID-19 cases per population, so it shows both the number of cases and the population affected.

Toronto’s orange pattern in the TPH map is a hot spot area — it seems to be the site of the city’s hot spot — but its population does not directly relate to the number of COVID-19 cases in the city.

Instead, it’s a big city, with more than 400,000 people. But that number is almost certainly an underestimate.

As reported by the Star on Thursday, Toronto’s population has grown

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